Sample Reports

Updated: May 23, 2019

I'm on a mission to write shorter reports. More readable reports. Reports that take less time to write.


I still want my reports to be comprehensive. I want parents to have a full picture of their child. Her strengths. Her weaknesses. Her needs. I just want to do it in less time. And in a way people might actually read.


Over the years, I've experimented with different formats. I love to see other people's reports and find out what they're doing (and if there's any ideas I can steal). If you would be willing to share a de-identified report with me, I'd love to see it. I'm also happy to share what I've been experimenting with. Sometimes, I get requests to share a particular type of report with a colleague. Or, I want to share what I've been working on with a colleague. So, over the past year I have gone through the trouble of thoroughly de-identifying some reports. If you would like to look at any of these de-identified reports, please just contact me and I'll send you a link to a "hidden" page on this website where I have lots of samples you can look at.


  • If you just want to see how I structure the summary, take a look at this post, which includes a de-identified summary (the first 2 pages of my report).


If you do email me for the link to the "hidden" page and choose to look at the reports, please keep in mind 2 things:


1. All of the reports are de-identified. This means I changed some (but not all) genders, ages, demographic details, a few scores, etc. This process sometimes means that the text will not perfectly match up. It also means that while I am happy to share these reports with other psychologists, these reports are not meant to be distributed widely. They are thoroughly de-identified, but not entirely fictional. Please treat with care, and don't share (if you know someone who wants to look at them - cool! Send them my way).


2. These are not meant to be my "best" reports. They are just random reports that for various reasons I've already gone through the trouble of de-identifying.


Please feel free to look at and borrow from anything you like. Feedback, suggestions, praise :), and constructive criticism welcome!




©2018 by Stephanie Nelson, Ph.D.